Ingenuity, creativity and entrepreneurship are alive and well in our youth, as exhibited at the “Youth Entrepreneur Market” held at the Lehi Legacy Center on Saturday, November 7. The event was the brainchild of Charlee Linford, Lehi Legacy Center program coordinator. Along with program assistants Camille Purtsehert and Jessica Worthen, Linford created an exciting day of shopping for attendees and an opportunity for over 30 participants to share their creative ventures for everyone to see and purchase.

One young vendor, Kyri Miller, daughter of Tory and Brandon Miller, made lip balm holders from her mother’s left-over ribbon. “I had a sewing class at school and grabbed my mom’s sewing machine, ribbon, and with a pattern my mother found. I began making them,” said Kyri. After selling her creations on social media, she decided she had made something that people liked. “Kyri’s Kreations” were a hit at the market. Kyri is 12 years old and lives in American Fork.

Another popular vendor was “Jewelry from Kenya.” Brissa Aduwo, daughter of Melissa and Jack Aduwo, had connections with family members in Kenya. When she saw the beautiful jewelry made by locals in Kenya, she knew she wanted to share the unique designs with family and friends. Brissa made the necklaces, bracelets, and earrings from native Kenyan materials with beads, leather, and hand-carved wooden objects, all perfectly and creatively combined for unusual and unique accessories.

13 year -old Ryan Anderson, son of Lisa and Brett Anderson, said, “I wanted a simple and comfortable T-shirt.” With his knowledge of “Illustrator,” a computer program he learned, Ryan designed T-shirts for kids and young adults. One of the most popular was a white and grey shirt that said “Baller” on it. The T-shirt was an instant success.

Good friends Zoey Assmus and Rachel Frei made use of left-over two by fours used in a basement finishing project to make craft projects for youngsters. The girls cut and sanded the wooden boards and provided craft materials to make pumpkins, Santas, and other projects, to sell in a kit. Moms Jerah Assmus and Sam Frei said, “The girls are always selling stuff.”

One of the most intriguing displays was called “Tyrannosaurus Toys.” The booth was the creation of Ty Corbridge. “I like dinosaurs, and my name is Ty, so that is how I named my products. One item was tiny dinosaur magnets made with melted crayons and put in molds. He also made bath bombs with tiny dinosaurs in the middle. As the bombs melted in the bathtub, a tiny dinosaur appeared. Maybe the most unique was “Excavation Eggs.” The eggs, made of a plaster material, could be chipped away, revealing a tiny dinosaur inside. 

The Saturday event provided an opportunity to showcase our impressive youth’s creative thinking, handicraft skills, and entrepreneurship. Organizers announced first, second and third place awards.

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